Accurate Ambiguity

By: Matt Garrott
By: Matt Garrott

Punxsutawney Phil practices accurate ambiguity. The vast majority of the time, he sees his shadow.  This portends 6 more weeks of winter, generally lining up with the Spring Equinox.  What a great strategy.  Winter usually lasts 6 more weeks so predict 6 more weeks of winter and most of the time you’ll be right.  He does not predict exact temperatures or exactly when it will turn warm.

Contrast this with the investment world. The market generally goes up, but we seek out experts to comfort us with false precision.  How much screen time is wasted discussing resistance levels, Dow 20,000, or predicting the S&P 500’s earnings?  If you’re a long-term investor, none of this matters.  What matters is that the market goes up over time.  Like the changing of the seasons, the market has its ups and downs, but the harder you try to pinpoint these changes, the more likely you are to wind up wearing cargo shorts in the snow. Continue Reading

Trump Portfolio

By: Matt Garrott
By: Matt Garrott

We’ve witnessed the peaceful exchange of power in the most powerful country on the planet.  Now, how do we create a “Trump Portfolio” of only the best, really the greatest, everybody says so securities?  Does it make sense to overweight small cap manufacturing stocks that might benefit from a strong dollar or perhaps bank stocks to take advantage of rising rates?

Here’s a better question: What’s more important, the person in the White House or the person who owns the portfolio?  It doesn’t make sense to put Grandma in volatile small cap stocks if what she really needs is income.  Likewise, it wouldn’t be prudent for a 20-something to move everything to cash because they don’t agree with the President’s politics.  I hope you already knew this, but there is no optimal “Trump Portfolio”.  Rather than rebuilding their portfolio every time the winds change in Washington, D.C., investors should build around their personal needs and goals.\

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Market Commentary Q4 2016

By: Matt Garrott
By: Matt Garrott

What Happened in 2016

The stock market started the year on the wrong foot with a 10% drawdown. It was the worst start to a calendar year ever and prompted knee-jerk reactions such as the RBS note for their clients to “sell everything”.  At the end of June, the UK held a referendum on whether to withdraw from the European Union.  “Bremain” was the clear leader heading into the election as “Brexit” was viewed as dangerous and sure to drop the markets into a tailspin.  Brexit won.  There was an election here in the United States which also had a surprise outcome.  All three of these events were supposed to be harbingers of disaster.  Instead, stocks went on a tear as the S&P 500 gained 12%.  The city of Cleveland also got in on the action.  The Cleveland Indians lost a heartbreaking World Series, but UFC, minor league hockey, and NBA championships were all brought home to the greatest location in the nation, defying experts every step of the way.

The S&P 500 has been up for 8 consecutive calendar years (kind of – 2015 was negative if you don’t count dividends), but like my dad says, “It ain’t the years, it’s the mileage.” Since the market bottom in March of 2009, the S&P 500 has experienced a cumulative 287% return. For some perspective, it gained 450% from 1991-1999 so our current bull market has not climbed “too far, too fast” as some may argue.  There is an old Wall Street saying that the market takes the elevator down and the stairs back up.  Maybe it should be revised as we’ve been strolling up a ramp for the last 8 years.  Looking back, it can seem like the recovery has been a gentle walk, but this slow stroll hasn’t been without its hiccups.  During the recovery we’ve had 4 corrections (10% or greater drawdown).  Each of these was supposed to be the end of the bull market so congratulations if you didn’t get scared out of your allocations.

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What Would a Rate Spike Look Like?

By: Matt Garrott
By: Matt Garrott

The S&P 500 is up over 3% since the election. I hesitate to call this a “Trump Rally”, especially as the election looms so large in recent memory.  For now, it seems prudent to recognize that the election has brought with it a reduction in uncertainty and a sigh of relief that the contentious campaign season has come to an end.  While the media is distracted by every shiny object the President-elect waves in front of them, they are missing a bigger story.  The Federal Reserve is expected to raise rates in December which would send ripples through multiple markets.  What would a rate spike look like?  We don’t have to go very far to find out.  We just had one.

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Prediction Fiction

By: Mark Weiskind
By: Mark Weiskind

No matter your political leaning, you likely didn’t expect Donald Trump to win the election last week.  Most of the “experts” (the pollsters, the pundits, the media) sure didn’t see it coming, Hillary Clinton seemed a lock.  Nor did you likely expect the stock market would rally in the days after his win.  Again, the “experts” (the Wall Street analysts, the talking heads on CNBC, even yours truly) warned that a Trump victory would likely lead to an immediate sell-off, due to the surprise and uncertainty such a win would cause.  Yet the Dow rallied over 4% in the three days after the election.  In a recent Bloomberg survey, not one of 65 Wall Street analysts predicted 10-year Treasuries would rise about 2% by year-end.  Yet the 10-Year rate now sits at nearly 2.25%.

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Angels’ Share

By: Matt Garrott
By: Matt Garrott

As a whisky (whiskey here in the States) matures, it loses about 2% of its volume to evaporation each year.  Distilleries call this The Angels’ Share.  They fill oak casks with a precious liquid knowing that each year part of their hard work will simply disappear.  I can’t help but think of the angels’ share when I look at expense ratios.  An investor sets aside a certain amount of money, let’s say $100,000.  They pay a money manager to invest that money – I’ll use the S&P 500 as an example When the investor looks at their statement, they should see that their investment returned the same amount as the index, less whatever the expense was, right?  Looking at the annualized returns, yes, that’s approximately right.  Looking at actual dollars, we see something different.  A portion of the returns evaporates, escaping the pockets of both investor and money manager.

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Keeping up with the Joneses

By: Matt Garrott
By: Matt Garrott

The 2016 Harvard Management Company Annual Endowment Report is out.  What was once a great write-up about the cutting edge of investment management now serves as a warning that every investor can learn from.  The endowment’s fixation on keeping up with the Joneses (Yale and Stanford, especially) has led to management turnover, investment collection, and poor returns.

The endowment lost 2% over the twelve months ending on June 30, 2016. The S&P 500 was up 4% over that time while a 60% S&P 500 / 40% Barclays Aggregate Bond Index portfolio would have been up 5%.  The report blames the poor performance on everything from low interest rates to market volatility, but it looks more and more like the problem stems from trying to keep up with the Joneses.  Peer returns are even listed as one of Harvard Management Company’s three investment objectives alongside real returns and relative returns.

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What Does a 20% Gain Feel Like?

By: Matt Garrott
By: Matt Garrott

What do you remember most about the markets over the last 12 months or so? Was it the big drawdown in the first quarter?  Brexit?  Maybe the flash crash from a year ago?  How did you feel during each of these supposedly world-ending crises and how do you feel now that they are in the rear-view mirror?

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Lessons from Musashi

By: Matt Garrott
By: Matt Garrott

What is the most important action an investor can take? Sometimes it is taking no action at all.  We were recently pitched a hot new hedge fund.  It is run by an eclectic genius (aren’t they all?), has good performance, and the client base is of such a pedigree that they’re part of the marketing material.  We passed.  Why?  There were several glaring red flags, but it also failed the most important question: would this investment be additive to a diversified portfolio?  In other words, would adding this investment get our clients to their financial goals faster or with less risk?

This reminds me of an old story:

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Flatlining

By: Matt Garrott
By: Matt Garrott

It’s been over a year since the S&P hit its all-time high. The market has been going sideways.  From February 16th, 2015 through May 31st, 2016, the S&P 500 has returned 0%.  Investors have earned nothing.  Or have they?

While the market returned “0%” from point to point, savvy investors took advantage of two 10%+ dips by the S&P 500, one in August of 2015 and the other in February of 2016. There was no need to pick individual stocks or sectors.  There was no need to count oil rigs, follow dry bulk rates, or parse the latest Federal Reserve meeting minutes.  Investors only needed to stick with their plan.  Those who contributed to their 401(k)s or rebalanced during the dips ended up buying low.  Investors who harvested losses banked an asset that gives them more control of their taxes in the future.

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